ROBB WOLF PALEO SOLUTION EBOOK

adminComment(0)

Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Asserting that "modern life causes diabetes, The Paleo Solution: The Original Human Diet - site edition by Robb Wolf. Download it site Store; ›; site eBooks; ›; Cookbooks, Food & Wine. After your download, you'll see a link to immediately download your eBook bundle . The Paleo on a Budget Guide is the solution you've been looking for. The Paleo Solution Podcast. Robb Wolf talking on a podcast Get access to my full library of ebooks and digital resources on all things Paleo, including.


Robb Wolf Paleo Solution Ebook

Author:LADAWN GADOURY
Language:English, Dutch, Arabic
Country:Chile
Genre:Biography
Pages:114
Published (Last):14.05.2016
ISBN:918-7-29322-468-3
ePub File Size:30.45 MB
PDF File Size:20.60 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Sign up for free]
Downloads:34350
Uploaded by: ALDA

Read "The Paleo Solution The Original Human Diet" by Robb Wolf available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first download. Do you want to. Jul 25, The Paleo Solution incorporates the latest, cutting edge research from Written by Robb Wolf, a research biochemist who traded in his lab coat. In WIRED TO EAT, superstar US diet expert, Paleo sensation and New York Times bestselling author of THE PALEO SOLUTION Robb Wolf will show you how to.

He attempts this with a silly analogy about a box of ceramic shards that doesn't pass the laugh test when you realize what he's trying to sell. I'm starting to repeat myself, but I can't help it. It's what this whole book is so far. Of course, the reason he asserts that doctors and scientists don't agree with them is that scientists are "annoyed by the past" and that "it would be too simple" or that scientists somehow don't consider humans part of nature.

Has this guy ever met a scientist? I'm just trying to figure out if he's an intentional liar or just entirely deluded. I've been met with his very "fair proposition" which is that even if you don't believe his gobbledy-goop, the only "fair" thing to do is exactly what he tells you to anyway.

I'm not sure how he manages to square that line of thought with reason. Part Five Experiments In Bad Thinking There comes a point where he tells a hypothetical story about convincing someone by taking him around a college campus to talk to various experts to prove his point.

The whole story is a classic exercise in bad thinking. Leaving aside all the places where he takes a moment in his story to place himself above the academia by inventing a question to ask them and then declaring that they are stumped or had never thought of it before, there are huge problems here.

The former trick is common among cult leaders and those who would gather fanatical adherents and it's a tactic called "controlled response for self-elevation. The idea is that we are subconsciously convinced that the hero has all the answers because we forget that the person selling this heroic idea is also the one writing both the question and answers and that writer would never include a question they didn't feel they could make a good-sounding answer to.

The whole idea is to elevate yourself by creating a fictional scenario where you are superior to everyone including and especially the "experts" and hope that no one notices that the situation is fiction. Wait, I was going to leave that whole bit aside, wasn't I?

Back to the point.

In his fictional story, he goes to the Anthropology department and asks them what the most important event in human history is. They answer "the agricultural revolution.

Wired to Eat Book Review with Robb Wolf

The anthropologists talk about rising levels of disease and general life discomfort. This fictional situation is all designed to sell us on why the paleo diet is correct.

In other words, without his long winded needless extras, we got sicker more often after the agricultural revolution. His conclusion?

With me so far? Anyone with even a slight understanding of logic will point out that this is a classic case of "post hoc ergo propter hoc", which means "after it, therefor because of it.

Let me give you a couple of examples to illustrate the point. These examples will seem silly but they are not actually any logically different from the leap he is making. I'll explain why that's so later on.

Example One: I was born. When I was eight years old, I broke my leg falling off my bicycle. Therefor, being born caused my broken leg.

One can certainly say that had I not been born, I would not have broken my leg, but there is absolutely no basis for suggesting that being born actually directly CAUSED my broken leg and that's a difference of astronomical proportions. No one would agree with my example above as being logically sound and yet it's not really any different from what he's done above from a logical perspective.

Let's look at another example. Example Two with a twist : I have blue eyes. Throughout my life I am married and divorced three times.

The twist to this example is that there is no reason to think that if I didn't have blue eyes, I would not have still ended up getting divorced over the years. This is closer to his story because there is no reason to think that if the agricultural revolution hadn't happened, that something else would not have happened and that disease rates would not have still risen.

Now that we see the basic problem with this type of thinking, let's look at why his specific story is bad. Fortunately, due to the sadly constructed argument he makes, I only need one alternative explanation that allows both things agricultural revolution and declining health to happen near the same time and still explain the difference.

I should state that I do not know for a fact that these things happened at the same time, though I'm willing to grant that it might be true. Even though I only need one example to disprove the foundation of his assertion, here are several: 1. Exercise - Hunger Gatherers had a very different level of fitness. Just try outrunning a pack of wolves or chasing down a pack of antelope on foot.

Population Density - The larger the group that lives together the greater the chance of disease spread and the greater the opportunity for diseases to evolve into entirely new problems of their own. The Agricultural revolution made it possible for people to live in larger groups.

The Paleo Solution

Having some food easily accessible and others that require more effort increases the likelihood that someone will not maintain any kind of balance in their diet. Number 3 is critical because that's actually all his fictional anthoropologist says even though he pretends that somehow agriculture CAUSES disease.

There are, by the way, many more reasons that would explain this, but three is plenty for our purposes. It's actually sort of impressive how consistently he manages to include anything resembling a clear thought that isn't buried under bad ideas and false conclusions designed to make him sound right.

Moving on.

Is anyone else annoyed when he forces his fake professors to say things that conveniently prove his point and further indicate at the untrustworthiness of scientists and the medical profession? I'm not saying those people are perfect or that they are always right, but his repeated need to make them look bad and elevate himself to the position of savior is not only pathetic, it's downright wrong.

Part Six So far, I have not encountered a single paragraph of value. That's not the sort of truth this author is likely to consider and he certainly won't consider the implications of that truth. My My.

Going forward, please assume that for every thing I mention that is broken in this book, there are approximately 99 that I haven't mentioned for space reasons. Part Seven The whole "sales pamphlet" nature of this work is really getting to me. It seems to be a book about selling the diet and making himself into a savior and only be disguised as a book of, you know, valuable information or things for an intelligent person to consider. It's a book clearly aimed at those who are unwilling or unable to actually think about what he's saying.

I'm starting to wonder about the mental capacity of the five star reviewers. I prefer to think that they are all his friends and just doing him a favor. No one is dumb enough to download all this.

Wired to Eat: How to Rewire Your Appetite and Lose Weight for Good

I hope. Part Eight My advice is to skip the part where he "walks you through" the science departments of a college.

So unless you've never read a book on Paleo before, most of this will be repetition for you. Seriously, that's all it is. The way it works is, you download a blood glucose-testing monitor. You then wait 2 hours, then measure your blood glucose level to determine if this particular food is a problem for you or not.

The thing is, the quantities of food you need to eat to reach 50g of effective carb are ludicrous. Want to test carrots? You've got to eat 6 CUPS of chopped raw carrot! Eat 3. Eat 2. To repeat, eat nothing but 2. Nobody eats 2 whole raw onions, all by themselves. You eat a far smaller quantity, with fat and protein, which partially offset the glycemic hit. So I don't know, maybe I'm missing something, but this seems really weird to me. He makes a lot of jokes that just aren't funny.

There is a chapter dedicated to ketosis and intermittent fasting, which was good info. I appreciated the fact that he points out that very low carb is NOT for everyone since I seem to be one of those people. I was really hoping there was more to the "personalized nutrition" part of this book, but the 7-Day Carb Test is it. Seems like that could have been covered in one blog post, as opposed to a page book. Along with an improvement in his writing, he's gained a deeper understanding of metabolism, nutrition, and motivation, and applied his insights to this book.

See a Problem?

He steps away from the Paleo diet a bit, focusing more on the science that supports low-carb diets and personalized nutrition. The 7-day carb test is especially enlightening, encouraging you to use a blood glucose meter to record y Wired to Eat by Robb Wolf reads like a more scientific, better written version of his The Paleo Solution. The 7-day carb test is especially enlightening, encouraging you to use a blood glucose meter to record your own personal reaction to certain high-carbohydrate foods.

For example, I've discovered bananas and rice bring my blood sugar to diabetic levels, while I can handle oats and potatoes with no problem. Personalized nutrition is a fascinating topic, and it's great to read a health book that has a wide view of what might work for you. I especially like how the author said their is no "cheating" on a diet. Food is not a relationship.There is a chapter dedicated to ketosis and intermittent fasting, which was good info. Exercise - Hunger Gatherers had a very different level of fitness.

One is that the dangers of fructose are not discussed separately and in more detail.

I should state that I do not know for a fact that these things happened at the same time, though I'm willing to grant that it might be true. There is a chapter dedicated to ketosis and intermittent fasting, which was good info. That's the version of himself that he has invented. Along with an improvement in his writing, he's gained a deeper understanding of metabolism, nutrition, and motivation, and applied his insights to this book.

ZAIDA from High Point
See my other posts. I'm keen on second-language acquisition. I do fancy exploring ePub and PDF books shakily .
>